Posts Tagged ‘script’

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Creating a Daily Journal in Evernote

15/03/2010

This post has now been migrated to ThoughtAsylum.com.

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ENScript – Scripting Evernote in Windows

21/08/2009

This post has now been migrated to ThoughtAsylum.com.

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Filter files into silo folders

31/07/2009

Recently a number of my friends have hard hard drive failures and have asked me to retrieve data from their hard drives.  I’ve been reasonably successful in each case recovering well over 95% of the data in each case – thanks not to me but the proliferation of free data recovery tools out there on the Internet.

The last one I’ve been working on however has had a particularly mangled folder structure such that a large number of the recovered files haven’t been able to be assigned the correct file name and folder.  The recovery software has auto generated file names and placed them in a single folder … all 245,528 of them.  As you might expect Windows isn’t all that happy with that many files in a single folder when you want to interact with them.

Windows Explorer is incredibly slow to interact with this amount of content and even using SnowBird the speed of access was prohibitive.  I had a need to somehow rearrange the files into some other structure and since the naming is random, the folder structure does not need to be particularly meaningful – just practical to sort through.  Given there was no (free) software up to the job and being the consummate IT support chap I am  I decided to script my way around the problem.

I wrote a VB Script to process the folder of files and to “silo” the files off into groups within other folders.  A couple of constants at the top of the script tell it which folder to process and how many files to put into each folder.  The script then calculates how many folders to create and starts to process them.  I’ve used my generic progress window to show what file is being moved and how far through the process the script is.

The script doesn’t contain anything particularly nifty that hasn’t already been covered in one of my previous VB Script posts, so rather than displaying the source code here I’ve just provided it as a download:

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Don’t log on as admin just yet

23/07/2009

On Windows XP you may find that you need to carry out some tasks as an administrator for which you would logon as  an administrator (local or network/domain).  If the user is already logged on then you can choose to run as administrator for many activities by selecting run as from a file’s context menu.  However not every type of file has this option.

My preferred method to get around this is to run a file management application as an administrator and then any file action from within that is run as an administrator.  The RUNAS executable is accessible from the command line and along with the right selection of parameters should make this quite easy to do.  Unfortunately a restriction around instances (and the fact that the Windows Desktop is an instance of EXPLORER.EXE) means that EXPLORER.EXE can’t be run as – at least not without changing some settings in Windows.

The alternative is to use the fact that Internet Explorer is a standard component and has a synonymity with explorer.  So to quickly access the C drive in explorer (via Internet Explorer) I suggest popping the following line into a shortcut and deploying it to every machine or at least a quickly accessible folder on your network (with a short name you can then quickly type into a Run dialog).

runas /user:administrator "C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe c:"

This assumes your admin account is called “administrator” (add an ‘@yourdomain’ after this for domain admin access on the appropriate domain) and Internet Explorer is installed under program files in a folder called Internet Explorer.  You could similarly make this a .BAT file rather than a shortcut file (.LNK),  but I think the shortcut is a slightly neater looking option.

When run a command prompt window will be opened and ask for the password.  Type this in and press enter/return to have Windows open your nice admin file management session.  Just remember to close the window when you’ve finished … you don’t want to leave end users with admin access.

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Presentations – Keeping your screen active

20/07/2009

Power saving options on computers are something that I personally think are great.  They not only help reduce carbon footprints, but they also help draw out even more life from your laptop battery.   One of the main ways in which this is done (others being things such as disabling hardware) is by having an inactivity option that turns off the screen and the hard disk after a period of inactivity.  Unfortunately there are times when this isn’t something you want.  The primary example of this is when you are giving a presentation.

The typical way of overriding this in Windows is to change what power saving scheme is being used through the Windows control panel or a third party application that links directly to these options.  However sometimes end users don’t have access to this.

This typically occurs where a group policy has been applied to stop users ‘tinkering’ with the power saving schemes.  Users with access can amend or delete power saving schemes which can lead to complications with machines and so it is not that uncommon to restrict access.

Whilst applications such as Microsoft PowerPoint can lead the OS into knowing that it should keep things like monitors on if a presentation is in a browser or some other “power unaware” application, then power saving actions can kick in.

I decided to apply a brute force solution to this by creating an AutoHotKey script to send a key press to the OS at regular intervals.  By default it sends a Shift key press as this is least likely to have any impact on any application, but this can be modified along with the frequency with which it is sent by the use of a settings file.  The settings file also includes an option to choose whether to start sending key presses as soon as it is run.

The code for the script is given at the end of this post, but I have also compiled this into a stand alone executable that you could even pop onto your flash drive if you’re going to be presenting on someone else’s PC.  Similarly you could add it into your start-up group (with it set not to auto start sending key presses) so it is always there when you need it.

The script places a monitor icon in the system tray.  When it is black power saving actions through inactivity will take place.  When it is blue, key presses will be sent.  Right clicking on the icon will display a menu with an override option.  Selecting this option will place a check mark next to it which will set the icon blue and initiate the override mode.  Selecting the option again will uncheck it, set the icon black and turn off the override mode.

Only one setting is available on the settings menu.  This is another check item and determines whether override mode should be enabled immediately when the utility is first started.

The utility looks for a settings file called ActiveDisplay.ini in the folder from which the utility is being run.  If it does not exist, the utility will use its default settings which match the settings given in this example file:

[Settings]
;Set to 1 to enable override mode at start-up and 0 to disable.
EnableOnRun=0
;Specify what characters should be sent.  Use {} for special key strokes
KeyStroke={SHIFT}
;Number of milliseconds between sending the key strokes (120,000 milliseconds : 2 minutes)
Period=120000

If you want to tweak the script to meet your own needs you can get the details below and use your own icons.  If you want to get the compiled version you can download it for free.

#Persistent
#SingleInstance

;Read in settings
iniread, EnableAtStartup, %A_ScriptDir%\ActiveDisplay.ini, Settings, EnableOnRun, 0
iniread, KeyStroke, %A_ScriptDir%\ActiveDisplay.ini, Settings, KeyStroke, {Shift}
iniread, Period, %A_ScriptDir%\ActiveDisplay.ini, Settings, Period, 120000

;Create the tray menu
menu, tray, add, Override, Override
Menu, SettingsMenu, add, EnabledAtStartup
Menu, tray, add, Settings, :SettingsMenu
menu, tray, add, About
menu, tray, add, Exit
menu, tray, nostandard

;Initialise
;Time to do something that seems crazy - we'll flip these and then call the menu selection routines where it will get flipped back
EnableTimer := EnableAtStartup
EnableAtStartup := Not(EnableAtStartup)
GoSub, EnabledAtStartup
EnableTimer := Not(EnableTimer)
GoSub, Override
return

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;

SendKeyStroke:
Send %KeyStroke%
return

Override:
EnableTimer := Not(EnableTimer)
If EnableTimer
{
 menu, tray, Check, Override
 menu, tray, icon, C:\Icons\Monitor On.ico
 menu, tray, tip, Default Power Saving Mode Overridden
 SetTimer, SendKeyStroke, %Period%
}
Else
{
 menu, tray, UnCheck, Override
 menu, tray, icon, C:\Icons\Monitor Off.ico
 menu, tray, tip, Default Power Saving Mode
 SetTimer, SendKeyStroke, Off
}
return

EnabledAtStartup:
EnableAtStartup := Not(EnableAtStartup)
If EnableAtStartup
{
 menu, SettingsMenu, Check, EnabledAtStartup
 iniwrite, 1, %A_ScriptDir%\ActiveDisplay.ini, Settings, EnableOnRun
}
Else
{
 menu, SettingsMenu, UnCheck, EnabledAtStartup
 iniwrite, 0, %A_ScriptDir%\ActiveDisplay.ini, Settings, EnableOnRun
}
return

About:
MsgBox, 0, About Active Display, Version 1.0`nCopyright 2009 RebootIT`n`nhttps://flagit.wordpress.com
return

Exit:
ExitApp
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Firefox IE Tab Script Debug Errors

30/05/2009

Recently I’ve been working a little bit with Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007.  It is recommended that Internet Explorer is used to interact with this web based system as it provides the widest and tightest integration and range of features.  Unfortunately I have a strong preference for Mozilla Firefox over Internet Explorer.

However there’s a nice add-on for Firefox that helps me get round the annoyance of having to have two browsers open – IE Tab.  Whilst it is still fundamentally using Internet Explorer, it allows me to set sites to automatically load into a Firefox tab and render a page using the Internet Explorer ‘engine’.  One browser window and no need to remember when to open another browser.

Unfortunately SharePoint seems to play poorly sometimes.  Whilst still fundamentally working I was getting a lot of problems accessing my ‘My Site’  and occasional problems in other areas.  I was plagued by dialog boxes asking me if I would like to debug when trying to move the mouse pointer to click on a link.  So much so that it just seemed to be unusable.

This seems to be a known issue (and looks like it falls back to some poor SharePoint coding), and Microsoft recommend simply turning off the warnings by setting an option in Internet Explorer.  Far from ideal, but it’s not like I can fix the problems for them.

Disable Script Debugging

Disable Script Debugging

To set this, open Internet Explorer, select the tools menu and Internet options… .  Select the Advanced tab and in the browsing section select the “Disable Screen Debugging (Internet Explorer)” option.

Unfortunately the debug messages continue to appear, but they don’t appear in Internet Explorer when it is run outside of Firefox.  I double checked and without this option set Internet Explorer did experience the same issues.

The resolution to the IE Tab in Firefox is however close to hand.  It seems odd at first that the disable option explicitly mentions Internet Explorer.  After all what else would you set an option for…?  Well it looks like there’s a separate option for anything using the Internet Explorer rendering engine outside of the main browser … such as IE Tab.  The option is “Disable Screen Debugging (Other)” and it works like a charm.

So until Microsoft sort out their SharePoint warnings and for all those IE Tab users out there who need to use SharePoint I’d recommend popping into Internet Explorer and setting the script debugging options.

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VBScript – Select a Folder

28/03/2009

This post has now been migrated to ThoughtAsylum.com.

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